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Last Saturday, I presented at the local Azure Bootcamp here in Singapore. My session was titled “Introduction to Azure Machine Learning”, and I was extremely happy to see that there was a great amount of people interested in it (as it was the first session of the day, some people even had to stand at the back of the room; more chairs were brought in for sessions afterwards).

Here is the slide deck I used. As for the demo, I have a mini-series in the pipeline.

This coming Saturday, April 16, the Global Azure Bootcamp takes place once again. As I just move back to Singapore, I’ll speak here locally on the topic of Azure Machine Learning:

Introduction to Azure Machine Learning

Machine Learning runs predictive models that learn from existing data in order to forecast future behaviors, outcomes, and trends. A practical example for this is when you swipe your credit card somewhere and the bank verifies via Machine Learning if the transaction is likely to be a fraud. An other example are online shopping recommendations based on what you want to buy and what others have purchased before.

In this session, we’ll lay the foundation for understanding the basics of Machine Learning, and see some practical examples of how it can be implemented on Azure

Visit http://singapore.azurebootcamp.net/ to view the agenda and register now!

Well, I realised that I announced my presentation, but never posted the slidedeck here. Without further ado, here it is:

A year ago, Microsoft released an updated set of Visio Stencils with icons for Office 365 and related products. They updated the set slightly and also provided the option to download the “older 2012 version”:

These stencils contain more than 300 icons to help you create visual representations of Microsoft Office or Microsoft Office 365 deployments including Skype for Business, Microsoft Exchange Server 2013, Microsoft Lync Server 2013, and Microsoft SharePoint Server 2013. The zip file now includes both stencil sets from 2012 and 2014.

Here’s an overview of all icons in the newest version:

Clouds

clouds

Communications

communications

Concepts

concepts1
concepts2

Databases

databases

Devices

devices

Security

security

Servers

servers

Services

services

Sites

sites

Users

users

On June 17th and 18th, an online SharePoint conference named SPBiz with a major focus on business-related topics will take place. I’ll participate with a session called “Practical Advice for developing your SharePoint Roadmap”:

On-premises, cloud, or both? One centralized farm or multiple farms in different geographical regions? SharePoint as an intranet, an Enterprise Content Management System, or as THE central platform for all your company’s applications? Deciding what to do with SharePoint in your organization is an important task that needs to be properly planned and aligned with business goals. Developing a roadmap can help you with getting a shared understanding of the way ahead, the initiatives to be undertaken, and the outcomes to be achieved. In this session, you will receive practical advice on how to get started and how to develop your own SharePoint roadmap.

My session will take place from 3-4pm EDT (9-10pm CET). More details can be found on the conference website, the schedule for the 17th can be seen here: http://www.spbizconf.com/sessions/agenda-wednesday-17th-june/

Hope to see you there!

The official Office 365 Roadmap received some updates today. Here are the changes:

Launched

Office 365 Groups Notebook Notebook enables teams to capture, compile, and share information within your Office 365 Groups experience. You’ll find the notebook In the ‘…’ menu in the group header, and you’ll be able to jump right into the notebook from any of our other groups experiences.

Compliance Center for Office 365 The Office 365 Compliance Center is one place to manage compliance across Office 365 for your organization. You can define central policies that apply across your data in Office 365, such as preserve policies that keep content in SharePoint and Exchange indefinitely or for a set time period. Links to existing SharePoint and Exchange compliance features bring together the compliance capabilities across Office 365.

Rolling Out

Edit Office 365 profile details page update The new edit profile details page experience will be available for Office 365 users via the portal web experience. You can access the new experience via the gear in the top right of the navigation bar Office 365 settings Me. The new experience will include additional features including updated web design while in edit mode, responsive page layout on smaller devices, and quick link to change your profile photo.

The official Office 365 Roadmap received some updates today. The 5 biggest ones are:

Launched

Office 365 Admin Center for Business
The dashboard experience has been simplified for the new business plans to highlight only the most used tasks including setup, adding new users, resetting passwords and managing subscriptions.The complete set of settings and tools are accessible from the left navigation menu.

Office 365 ISO 27018 Privacy Compliance
In the upcoming Office 365 ISO 27001 audit, Office 365 will be including the ISO 27018 Privacy controls in their assessment. Inclusion of these new controls in the ISO assessment will further help Office 365 validate to customers the level of protection Office 365 provides to protect the privacy of customer data.

 

Rolling Out

Clutter control and admin capabilities
We are adding capabilities to help you control some aspects for the mailbox Clutter feature. These include the ability to exclude selection communications from Clutter, enabling items such as corporate communications to bypass the Clutter model. It also adds controls to provide customer controlled sending identity for communications from the Clutter feature, such as controlling the sending name and applying a corporate identity to improve trust in the messages. The round of updates also provides admin controls to assign a specific retention tag for the Clutter folder.

 

In Development

About Me Update and New Authoring Tool
The Office 365 user profile page, aka “About Me,” is getting a significant update. First, it will be more user friendly in its overall presentation and how it looks and responds across all devices. This update also introduces a new page authoring tool – that at first will be used to create stories within the company – then expand to enable creation of new types of dynamic pages. These stories and pages are created within the browser and have built-in hooks to add other Office 365 content (like documents from OneDrive for Business, videos from Office 365 Video and images a document library) in a seamless way. Finally, the new “About Me” page will highlight people and people search in a whole new way – from hierachical views, to showing who people most closely work with, and even a method to send a kudo to a co-worker.

Office 365 Video Update
Office 365 Video went into First Release (FR) on 11/18/14. This update will both move Office 365 Video to the broader worldwide production environment, beyond FR customers, and bring new updates for increased mobility and improved performance. For mobility, Office 365 Video will now have a companion iPhone app in the App Store, responsive Web pages across the video portal for access across devices of all sizes (PC, Mac, Android and iOS), plus extend video playback to non-Flash capable devices via our new HTML5-based player from Azure Media Services. We, too, have taken user feedback to enable more refinement for some of the admin controls available to portal and channel owners.

Microsoft has released a new version of the set of visio stencils with icons for Office 365 and the corresponding server products:

This set of stencils contains more than 300 icons to help you create visual representations of Microsoft Office or Microsoft Office 365 deployments including Microsoft Exchange Server 2013, Microsoft Lync Server 2013, and Microsoft SharePoint Server 2013.

While the previous versions contained all stencils in a single file, this time they have separated them into 10 different sets.  Here’s an overview of all icons in those sets:

Clouds

Communications

Concepts

Databases

Devices

Security

Servers

Services

Sites

Users

My family and myself moved from Singapore to Switzerland in May last year, and I had the opportunity to work as a SharePoint and Office 365 consultant in a small, but aspiring consultancy. And while the initially expected possibility to work with Office 365 turned out to be fairly small in the end, I was still able to learn quite a lot – be it preparing proposals, creating documentation, investigating server issues, or creating solutions. Earlier this year, another job opportunity came up, and for the first time in my life I had to choose between two really interesting and challenging roles. As the post title suggest, I chose the new role in the end. Thus, since the beginning of July, I’ve been working as a Collaboration & SharePoint Applications Teamlead for a large MNC. As the long job title implies, I’m leading a small team of SharePoint (and generally, collaboration applications) specialists. Our team focuses on the applications side of SharePoint, meaning we’re working closely with the business to deliver valuable solutions, while the platform team helps to provide a stable and performing infrastructure.

This move has brought a few changes with it for me personally. For one, while I was previously quite busy with a lot of things that kept me from blogging, I’ve been spending even less time on my blog ever since I changed roles. Part of this is due to a change in what I’m doing (see above), partially also because I tend to spent more time with my family after work (seeing your small daughter grow up is simply something that I wouldn’t want to miss for anything in the world) instead of “exploring the latest and greatest in technology”. The scope of my work has also changed from a nearly purely technical nature with a bit of “other stuff” (project involvement, documentation, governance, …) to one where I’m working more on the “softer side of SharePoint” and spend more time with developing a governance plan, contributing to or leading projects, and generally shaping the future of SharePoint within the organization. This also means that during the past few months, my community involvement has been extremely little. I hope to be able to pick up the pace again, but quite likely I’ll be contributing less actively than previously.

Nevertheless, there are a few smaller things that I want to write about soon, and some smaller projects that I am running on the side at the moment. So while there has been nothing new here for a while, you can look forward to at least a bit more content soon!

Over at the SharePoint Community, Balamurugan Kailasam posted that he was able to download the DLLs from SharePoint Online. While it is unclear at the moment why this is possible (maybe required by some tools?), or if this might be deactivated at some point, I decided nevertheless to write a small PowerShell script to download all DLLs that I’m aware of.

The code below create a subfolder with the current time as the name (in case you want to run it regularly and keep the older versions), and then downloads all the files into it. Additionally, it creates a file called info.txt with the version information of all DLLs

[Environment]::CurrentDirectory=(Get-Location -PSProvider FileSystem).ProviderPath
#replace contoso with your own tenant
$spUrl = "https://contoso.sharepoint.com/"

$dllsVTI = @("Microsoft.BusinessData.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Client.Policy.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Client.TranslationServices.dll", 
		"Microsoft.Office.DocumentManagement.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Excel.Server.Udf.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Excel.Server.WebServices.dll", 
		"Microsoft.Office.Policy.dll", "Microsoft.Office.SecureStoreService.Server.Security.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Server.dll", 
		"Microsoft.Office.Server.Search.Applications.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Server.Search.Connector.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Server.Search.dll", 
		"Microsoft.Office.Server.Search.ExchangeAdapter.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Server.UserProfiles.dll", 
		"microsoft.office.sharepoint.clientextensions.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Word.Server.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Workflow.Actions.dll", 
		"microsoft.office.workflow.tasks.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.DocumentManagement.dll", 
		"Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Publishing.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Runtime.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Search.Applications.dll", 
		"Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Search.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.ServerRuntime.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Taxonomy.dll", 
		"Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.UserProfiles.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.WorkflowServices.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.dll", 
		"Microsoft.SharePoint.Linq.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Portal.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Publishing.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Search.dll", 
		"Microsoft.SharePoint.Search.Extended.Administration.Common.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Search.Extended.Administration.dll", 
		"Microsoft.SharePoint.Search.Extended.Administration.ResourceStorage.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Security.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Taxonomy.dll", 
		"Microsoft.SharePoint.Taxonomy.Intl.dll", "microsoft.sharepoint.WorkflowActions.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.WorkManagement.Client.dll", 
		"Microsoft.Web.CommandUI.dll", "SHTML.dll", "spnativerequestmodule.dll")
		
$dllsAPP= @("Microsoft.Office.Discovery.Soap.dll", "Microsoft.Office.DocumentManagement.Pages.dll", 
 "Microsoft.Office.officialfileSoap.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Policy.Pages.dll", 
 "Microsoft.Office.Server.Search.Applications.ServerProxy.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Server.Search.ServerProxy.dll", 
 "Microsoft.Office.Server.UserProfiles.ServerStub.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Server.WorkManagement.ServerProxy.dll", "Microsoft.Office.SlideLibrarySoap.dll", 
 "Microsoft.Office.TranslationServices.ServerStub.dll", "Microsoft.Office.Workflow.Pages.dll", "Microsoft.Office.WorkflowSoap.dll", 
 "Microsoft.SharePoint.ApplicationPages.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.AppMonitoring.ApplicationPages.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.OfficeExtension.ApplicationPages.dll", 
 "Microsoft.SharePoint.Portal.Proxy.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.Taxonomy.ServerStub.dll", "Microsoft.SharePoint.WorkflowServices.ApplicationPages.dll", 
 "Microsoft.SharePoint.WorkflowServices.ServerProxy.dll", "STSSOAP.DLL")

$folder = new-item -type directory $(get-date -f yyyy-MM-dd_HH_mm_ss) 

function GetDll([string]$dll, [string]$path) {
	$file = $folder.FullName+"\"+$dll
	$wc = (New-Object System.Net.WebClient)
	write-host "Downloading ",$spUrl,$path,$dll
    	$wc.DownloadFile($spUrl + $path + $dll, $file)
	$item = get-item $file
	if($item) {
		add-content "$($folder)\info.txt" "$($item.Name) - $($Item.VersionInfo.ProductVersion)"
	}
}

foreach($dll in $dllsVTI) {
	GetDll $dll "_vti_bin/"
}

foreach($dll in $dllsAPP) {
	GetDll $dll "_app_bin/"
}